Our last day

Our last day

Last night we were treated to a surprise visit from Pete who dazzled us with his magic tricks! Cards appeared on the ceiling and in pockets, ropes became linked together, and tissues that were ripped apart suddenly ended up whole as if they were never torn.

The girls slept beautifully last night and are ready for an action packed day or snorkelling, rafting and treasure hunting. We are sure they will sleep even better tonight parents!

 

The adventure continues

The adventure continues

We were up early for the start of our busy second day. Bags were packed before breakfast and we were soon on the Rivercat to Circular Quay. While waiting for the Taronga ferry we ventured into the beautiful Customs House which we were amazed to learn was once the tallest building in the city.

Our walk to Chowder Bay saw us enjoying the beauty of Sydney’s bush land and harbour.
The kookaburras at lunch were very keen to grab our sausages!

This afternoon our groups are involved in their first activity. The Pink Panthers are out rafting in the bay, the Smurfs are snorkelling and the Unisaurs are off on a scavenger hunt.

All happy, all well and enjoying the great outdoors. I think it’s guaranteed we will all sleep well tonight.

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Our amazing Cockatoo Island

Our amazing Cockatoo Island

Once covered with red gums and cockatoos this historic island is now home to 56 shrieking girls! We have learned so much about our colonial and convict past on our scavenger hunt this afternoon. The teachers thought we might lock up the ‘worst of the worst’ in the solitary confinement cells. Life was pretty grim here for the convicts.

The girls are thoroughly enjoying the freedom to run and play on the grass. We will soon have a talk from the ranger before the much awaited announcement of tent groups.

Have you been to Cockatoo Island?

A big week ahead

A big week ahead

Year 6 will be inducted as school leaders on Tuesday morning and then we are off to camp on Wednesday for the rest of the week.

It’s a big week ahead of us but we will approach it all with enthusiasm and a positive outlook. We are looking forward to posting lots of photos and stories from camp.

Our teachers suggest that we get some early nights early in the week so we have plenty of energy for the fun and challenges that we will face while exploring our city’s beautiful harbour.

What you are looking forward to about camp?

What is the most fun you’ve had on a school camp?

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And so it begins

And so it begins

Welcome to Year 6 2018 and welcome to our class blog. We would love you to visit us often and see what we have been learning at school. It’s a great idea to subscribe to our blog so that you will receive an email when we write a new post. Please leave us comments too.

In our first week our Social Action Reps were involved in some planting on this amazing new green wall.

In class we all explored how we are feeling about Year 6 with a NESW Compass Points thinking routine and we worked together to see who could make the longest paper chain. The longest was an impressive 5.7 metres.

We have had a busy but exciting start to 2018 and hope you will follow and support us in our learning journey.

 

Become curious about our upcoming exhibition

Become curious about our upcoming exhibition

Do you love thinking outside of the box about real life issues that affect our world?

This is what Year 6 have been doing in our exhibition unit relating to Sharing the Planet.We are creating artworks which represent the underlying message in our central ideas. They are not finished but here are a few initial thoughts for you to ponder over. Come along next Thursday and Friday to view our exhibition findings. 

 

 

Do you know much about foot binding or calligraphy?

Do you know much about foot binding or calligraphy?

In novel studies this term we have been reading Chinese Cinderella. It is about an unwanted chinese girl and her struggle to prove her worth. The book had many aspects of chinese culture. We researched Calligraphy and Foot Binding. We found some really interesting information we’d like to share.

 

Calligraphy is an ancient Chinese tradition. In China, Calligraphy is considered the highest level of art. Unlike any other writing it is thought to be better than a painting or sculpture. Calligraphy has been done since 3000 years ago and at first was done on large animals shoulder bones or turtles shells which  was called shell and bone script. Calligraphy is a thing that is done using a bowl of ink, a brush and often a bowl of water if they had access to it. In China calligraphy used to be done with paper made of rice or hemp. Calligraphy has evolved and the modern version of it is sometimes called Hand Lettering. Hand Lettering is a way of making writing aesthetically pleasing.  It can include flourishes,accents and embellishments.  

 

Foot binding was a popular tradition in China. Young girls from the ages four to nine had their feet bound. Most binding was done during the Winter, as the coldness numbs their feet so they feel a lot less pain. They bound it by breaking every toe except the big toe and then folding it under the sole of their foot. Someone (parents even did it)  then broke the arch of the foot and their feet were then compressed with bandages to keep the form of their modified feet. One of the reasons foot binding was done was because people found it attractive if women had their feet bound. It also showed the family’s high status and that those women didn’t need their feet to work, so they were really important.

 

There are many health issues with binding feet. The main problem with binding feet was the infections caused by it. The women’s toenails would often grow inwards, causing infection in the foot. For this reason, some girl’s toenails were taken off altogether. If the infection in the feet and toes entered the bones, it often resulted in the arch softening even more and whole toes dropping off. This was actually seen as a good thing, as it meant that the foot could be bound even tighter. Because of the tight binding on the feet, circulation to the toes was mostly cut off and any toe injuries were unlikely to heal and the flesh sometimes rotted. Foot binding became very popular back then in China, women who didn’t need their feet required in their job and who were wealthy most of the time got their feet bound.  by Natalya, Alice, Sienna S, Tara and Jaemi.

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